Legendary Man Challenge Coins

Challenge coins have been a part of human history since the time of Rome, ensuring identity, or as a symbol of achievement and much more.

There is a rich history going back to the time of the Roman Empire where, challenge coins are said to have been given to soldiers to reward them with challenge coins to recognize their achievements.

During World War I. Before the entry of the United States into the war in 1917 American volunteers from all parts of the country filled the newly formed flying squadrons. Some were wealthy scions attending colleges such as Yale and Harvard who quit in mid-term to join the war.

It became tradition to ensure that all members carried their challenge coin at all times. A challenger would ask to see the challenge coin, if the challenged could not produce a coin, they were required to buy a drink of choice for the member who challenged them. If the challenged member produced a coin, then the challenging member was required to pay for the drink. This tradition continued throughout the war and for many years after the war while surviving members of the squadron were still alive.

Other traditional uses of challenge coins are: 

The Office of Strategic Service personnel were deployed in Nazi held France during World War I. The challenge coins were started by Jim Harrington of the 107th Infantry for his junior officers to help validate the authenticity of the person they were communicating with.

Colonel William "Buffalo Bill" Quinn had coins made for those who served in his 17th Infantry Regiment during 1950 and 1951.

Colonel Verne Green, commander of the 10th Special Forces Group-A, embraced the idea. He had a special coin struck with the unit's crest and motto in 1969. Until the 1980s, his unit was the only unit with an active challenge coin tradition.

The challenge coin tradition has spread to other military units, in all branches of service, and even to non-military organizations as well as the United States Congress, which produces challenge coins for members of Congress to give to constituents. In the Air Force, military training instructors award an airman's coin to new enlisted personnel upon completion of their United States Air Force Training and to new officers upon completion of the Air Force Officers Training.

Now, you have the opportunity to carry and present, The Legendary Man Challenge Coin.

Become one of the brotherhood today!

Testimonials
Additional Information



Challenge coins have been a part of human history since the time of Rome, ensuring identity, or as a symbol of achievement and much more.

There is a rich history going back to the time of the Roman Empire where, challenge coins are said to have been given to soldiers to reward them with challenge coins to recognize their achievements.

During World War I. Before the entry of the United States into the war in 1917 American volunteers from all parts of the country filled the newly formed flying squadrons. Some were wealthy scions attending colleges such as Yale and Harvard who quit in mid-term to join the war.

It became tradition to ensure that all members carried their challenge coin at all times. A challenger would ask to see the challenge coin, if the challenged could not produce a coin, they were required to buy a drink of choice for the member who challenged them. If the challenged member produced a coin, then the challenging member was required to pay for the drink. This tradition continued throughout the war and for many years after the war while surviving members of the squadron were still alive.

Other traditional uses of challenge coins are: 

The Office of Strategic Service personnel were deployed in Nazi held France during World War I. The challenge coins were started by Jim Harrington of the 107th Infantry for his junior officers to help validate the authenticity of the person they were communicating with.

Colonel William "Buffalo Bill" Quinn had coins made for those who served in his 17th Infantry Regiment during 1950 and 1951.

Colonel Verne Green, commander of the 10th Special Forces Group-A, embraced the idea. He had a special coin struck with the unit's crest and motto in 1969. Until the 1980s, his unit was the only unit with an active challenge coin tradition.

The challenge coin tradition has spread to other military units, in all branches of service, and even to non-military organizations as well as the United States Congress, which produces challenge coins for members of Congress to give to constituents. In the Air Force, military training instructors award an airman's coin to new enlisted personnel upon completion of their United States Air Force Training and to new officers upon completion of the Air Force Officers Training.

Now, you have the opportunity to carry and present, The Legendary Man Challenge Coin.

Become one of the brotherhood today!

Testimonials
Additional Information

Challenge coins have been a part of human history since the time of Rome, ensuring identity, or as a symbol of achievement and much more.

There is a rich history going back to the time of the Roman Empire where, challenge coins are said to have been given to soldiers to reward them with challenge coins to recognize their achievements.

During World War I. Before the entry of the United States into the war in 1917 American volunteers from all parts of the country filled the newly formed flying squadrons. Some were wealthy scions attending colleges such as Yale and Harvard who quit in mid-term to join the war.

It became tradition to ensure that all members carried their challenge coin at all times. A challenger would ask to see the challenge coin, if the challenged could not produce a coin, they were required to buy a drink of choice for the member who challenged them. If the challenged member produced a coin, then the challenging member was required to pay for the drink. This tradition continued throughout the war and for many years after the war while surviving members of the squadron were still alive.

Other traditional uses of challenge coins are: 

The Office of Strategic Service personnel were deployed in Nazi held France during World War I. The challenge coins were started by Jim Harrington of the 107th Infantry for his junior officers to help validate the authenticity of the person they were communicating with.

Colonel William "Buffalo Bill" Quinn had coins made for those who served in his 17th Infantry Regiment during 1950 and 1951.

Colonel Verne Green, commander of the 10th Special Forces Group-A, embraced the idea. He had a special coin struck with the unit's crest and motto in 1969. Until the 1980s, his unit was the only unit with an active challenge coin tradition.

The challenge coin tradition has spread to other military units, in all branches of service, and even to non-military organizations as well as the United States Congress, which produces challenge coins for members of Congress to give to constituents. In the Air Force, military training instructors award an airman's coin to new enlisted personnel upon completion of their United States Air Force Training and to new officers upon completion of the Air Force Officers Training.

Now, you have the opportunity to carry and present, The Legendary Man Challenge Coin.

Become one of the brotherhood today!

Testimonials
Additional Information

Challenge coins have been a part of human history since the time of Rome, ensuring identity, or as a symbol of achievement and much more.

There is a rich history going back to the time of the Roman Empire where, challenge coins are said to have been given to soldiers to reward them with challenge coins to recognize their achievements.

During World War I. Before the entry of the United States into the war in 1917 American volunteers from all parts of the country filled the newly formed flying squadrons. Some were wealthy scions attending colleges such as Yale and Harvard who quit in mid-term to join the war.

It became tradition to ensure that all members carried their challenge coin at all times. A challenger would ask to see the challenge coin, if the challenged could not produce a coin, they were required to buy a drink of choice for the member who challenged them. If the challenged member produced a coin, then the challenging member was required to pay for the drink. This tradition continued throughout the war and for many years after the war while surviving members of the squadron were still alive.

Other traditional uses of challenge coins are: 

The Office of Strategic Service personnel were deployed in Nazi held France during World War I. The challenge coins were started by Jim Harrington of the 107th Infantry for his junior officers to help validate the authenticity of the person they were communicating with.

Colonel William "Buffalo Bill" Quinn had coins made for those who served in his 17th Infantry Regiment during 1950 and 1951.

Colonel Verne Green, commander of the 10th Special Forces Group-A, embraced the idea. He had a special coin struck with the unit's crest and motto in 1969. Until the 1980s, his unit was the only unit with an active challenge coin tradition.

The challenge coin tradition has spread to other military units, in all branches of service, and even to non-military organizations as well as the United States Congress, which produces challenge coins for members of Congress to give to constituents. In the Air Force, military training instructors award an airman's coin to new enlisted personnel upon completion of their United States Air Force Training and to new officers upon completion of the Air Force Officers Training.

Now, you have the opportunity to carry and present, The Legendary Man Challenge Coin.

Become one of the brotherhood today!

Testimonials
Additional Information

Challenge coins have been a part of human history since the time of Rome, ensuring identity, or as a symbol of achievement and much more.

There is a rich history going back to the time of the Roman Empire where, challenge coins are said to have been given to soldiers to reward them with challenge coins to recognize their achievements.

During World War I. Before the entry of the United States into the war in 1917 American volunteers from all parts of the country filled the newly formed flying squadrons. Some were wealthy scions attending colleges such as Yale and Harvard who quit in mid-term to join the war.

It became tradition to ensure that all members carried their challenge coin at all times. A challenger would ask to see the challenge coin, if the challenged could not produce a coin, they were required to buy a drink of choice for the member who challenged them. If the challenged member produced a coin, then the challenging member was required to pay for the drink. This tradition continued throughout the war and for many years after the war while surviving members of the squadron were still alive.

Other traditional uses of challenge coins are: 

The Office of Strategic Service personnel were deployed in Nazi held France during World War I. The challenge coins were started by Jim Harrington of the 107th Infantry for his junior officers to help validate the authenticity of the person they were communicating with.

Colonel William "Buffalo Bill" Quinn had coins made for those who served in his 17th Infantry Regiment during 1950 and 1951.

Colonel Verne Green, commander of the 10th Special Forces Group-A, embraced the idea. He had a special coin struck with the unit's crest and motto in 1969. Until the 1980s, his unit was the only unit with an active challenge coin tradition.

The challenge coin tradition has spread to other military units, in all branches of service, and even to non-military organizations as well as the United States Congress, which produces challenge coins for members of Congress to give to constituents. In the Air Force, military training instructors award an airman's coin to new enlisted personnel upon completion of their United States Air Force Training and to new officers upon completion of the Air Force Officers Training.

Now, you have the opportunity to carry and present, The Legendary Man Challenge Coin.

Become one of the brotherhood today!

Testimonials
Additional Information